Author Archives: perfectionatic

Tupper’s self-referential formula in Julia

By: perfectionatic

Re-posted from: http://perfectionatic.org/?p=399

I was surprised when I came across on Tupper’s formula on twitter. I felt the compulsion to implement it in Julia.

The formula is expressed as

{1\over 2} < \left\lfloor \mathrm{mod}\left(\left\lfloor {y \over 17} \right\rfloor 2^{-17 \lfloor x \rfloor - \mathrm{mod}(\lfloor y\rfloor, 17)},2\right)\right\rfloor

and yields bitmap facsimile of itself.

In [1]:
k=big"960 939 379 918 958 884 971 672 962 127 852 754 715 004 339 660 129 306 651 505 519 271 702 802 395 266 424 689 642 842 174 350 718 121 267 153 782 770 623 355 993 237 280 874 144 307 891 325 963 941 337 723 487 857 735 749 823 926 629 715 517 173 716 995 165 232 890 538 221 612 403 238 855 866 184 013 235 585 136 048 828 693 337 902 491 454 229 288 667 081 096 184 496 091 705 183 454 067 827 731 551 705 405 381 627 380 967 602 565 625 016 981 482 083 418 783 163 849 115 590 225 610 003 652 351 370 343 874 461 848 378 737 238 198 224 849 863 465 033 159 410 054 974 700 593 138 339 226 497 249 461 751 545 728 366 702 369 745 461 014 655 997 933 798 537 483 143 786 841 806 593 422 227 898 388 722 980 000 748 404 719"
setprecision(BigFloat,10000);

In the above, the big integer is the magic number that lets us generate the image of the formula. I also need to setprecision of BigFloat to be very high, as rounding errors using the default precision does not get us the desired results. The implementation was inspired by the one in Python, but I see Julia a great deal more concise and clearer.

In [2]:
function tupper_field(k)
    field=Array{Bool}(17,106)
    for (ix,x) in enumerate(0.0:1:105.0), (iy,y) in enumerate(k:k+16)
        field[iy,107-ix]=1/2<floor(mod(floor(y/17)*2^(-17*floor(x)-mod(floor(y),17)),2))
    end
   field 
end
In [3]:
f=tupper_field(k);
using Images
img = colorview(Gray,.!f)
Out[3]:

I just inverted the boolean array here to get the desired bitmap output.

 

Exploring Fibonacci Fractions with Julia

By: perfectionatic

Re-posted from: http://perfectionatic.org/?p=367

Recently, I came across a fascinating blog and video from Mind you Decisions. It is about how a fraction
\frac{1}{999,999,999,999,999,999,999,998,,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999}
would show the Fibonacci numbers in order when looking at its decimal output.

On a spreadsheet and most standard programming languages, such output can not be attained due to the limited precision for floating point numbers. If you try this on R or Python, you will get an output of 1e-48.
Wolfram alpha,however,allows arbitrary precision.

In Julia by default we get a little better that R and Python

julia> 1/999999999999999999999998999999999999999999999999
1.000000000000000000000001000000000000000000000002000000000000000000000003000002e-48
 
julia> typeof(ans)
BigFloat

We observe here that we are getting the first few Fibonacci numbers 1, 1, 2, 3. We need more precision to get more numbers. Julia has arbitrary precision arithmetic baked into the language. We can crank up the precision of the BigFloat type on demand. Of course, the higher the precision, the slower the computation and the greater the memory we use. We do that by setprecision.

julia> setprecision(BigFloat,10000)
10000

Reevaluating, we get

julia> 1/999999999999999999999998999999999999999999999999
1.00000000000000000000000100000000000000000000000200000000000000000000000300000000000000000000000500000000000000000000000800000000000000000000001300000000000000000000002100000000000000000000003400000000000000000000005500000000000000000000008900000000000000000000014400000000000000000000023300000000000000000000037700000000000000000000061000000000000000000000098700000000000000000000159700000000000000000000258400000000000000000000418100000000000000000000676500000000000000000001094600000000000000000001771100000000000000000002865700000000000000000004636800000000000000000007502500000000000000000012139300000000000000000019641800000000000000000031781100000000000000000051422900000000000000000083204000000000000000000134626900000000000000000217830900000000000000000352457800000000000000000570288700000000000000000922746500000000000000001493035200000000000000002415781700000000000000003908816900000000000000006324598600000000000000010233415500000000000000016558014100000000000000026791429600000000000000043349443700000000000000070140873300000000000000113490317000000000000000183631190300000000000000297121507300000000000000480752697600000000000000777874204900000000000001258626902500000000000002036501107400000000000003295128009900000000000005331629117300000000000008626757127200000000000013958386244500000000000022585143371700000000000036543529616200000000000059128672987900000000000095672202604100000000000154800875592000000000000250473078196100000000000405273953788100000000000655747031984200000000001061020985772300000000001716768017756500000000002777789003528800000000004494557021285300000000007272346024814100000000011766903046099400000000019039249070913500000000030806152117012900000000049845401187926400000000080651553304939300000000130496954492865700000000211148507797805000000000341645462290670700000000552793970088475700000000894439432379146400000001447233402467622100000002341672834846768500000003788906237314390600000006130579072161159100000009919485309475549700000016050064381636708800000025969549691112258500000042019614072748967300000067989163763861225800000110008777836610193100000177997941600471418900000288006719437081612000000466004661037553030900000754011380474634642900001220016041512187673800001974027421986822316700003194043463499009990500005168070885485832307200008362114348984842297700013530185234470674604900021892299583455516902600035422484817926191507500057314784401381708410100092737269219307899917600150052053620689608327700242789322839997508245300392841376460687116573000635630699300684624818301028472075761371741391301664102775062056366209602692574850823428107600904356677625885484473810507049252476708912581411411405930102594397055221918455182579303309636633329861112681897706691855248316295261201016328488578177407943098723020343826493703204299739348832404671111147398462369176231164814351698201718008635835925499096664087184867000739850794865805193502836665349891529892378369837405200686395697571872674070550577925589950242511475751264321287522115185546301842246877472357697022053e-48

That is looking much better. However it we be nice if we could extract the Fibonacci numbers that are buried in that long decimal. Using the approach in the original blog. We define a function

y(x)=one(x)-x-x^2

and calculate the decimal

a=1/y(big"1e-24")

Here we use the non-standard string literal big"..." to insure proper interpretation of our input. Using BigFloat(1e-24)) would first construct at floating point with limited precision and then do the conversion. The initial loss of precision will not be recovered in the conversion, and hence the use of big. Now we extract our Fibonacci numbers by this function

function extract_fib(a)
   x=string(a)
   l=2
   fi=BigInt[]
   push!(fi,1)
   for i=1:div(length(x)-24,24)
        j=parse(BigInt,x[l+1+(i-1)*24:l+i*24])
        push!(fi,j)
   end
   fi
end

Here we first convert our very long decimal number of a string and they we exploit the fact the Fibonacci numbers occur in blocks that 24 digits in length. We get out output in an array of BigInt. We want to compare the output with exact Fibonacci numbers, we just do a quick and non-recursive implementation.

function fib(n)
    f=Vector{typeof(n)}(n+1)
    f[1]=f[2]=1;
    for i=3:n+1
       f[i]=f[i-1]+f[i-2]
    end
    f
end

Now we compare…

fib_exact=fib(200);
fib_frac=extract_fib(a);
for i in eachindex(fib_frac)
     println(fib_exact[i], " ", fib_exact[i]-fib_frac[i])
end

We get a long sequence, we just focused here on when the discrepancy happens.

...
184551825793033096366333 0
298611126818977066918552 0
483162952612010163284885 0
781774079430987230203437 -1
1264937032042997393488322 999999999999999999999998
2046711111473984623691759 1999999999999999999999997
...

The output shows that just before the extracted Fibonacci number exceeds 24 digits, a discrepancy occurs. I am not quite sure why, but this was a fun exploration. Julia allows me to do mathematical explorations that would take one or even two orders of magnitude of effort to do in any other language.

Using pipes while running external programs in Julia

By: perfectionatic

Re-posted from: http://perfectionatic.org/?p=340

Recently I was using Julia to run ffprobe to get the length of a video file. The trouble was the ffprobe was dumping its output to stderr and I wanted to take that output and run it through grep. From a bash shell one would typically run:

ffprobe somefile.mkv 2>&1 |grep Duration

This would result in an output like

 Duration: 00:04:44.94, start: 0.000000, bitrate: 128 kb/s

This works because we used 2>&1 to redirect stderr to stdout which would in be piped to grep.

If you were try to run this in Julia

julia> run(`ffprobe somefile.mkv 2>&1 |grep Duration`)

you will get errors. Julia does not like pipes | inside the backticks command (for very sensible reasons). Instead you should be using Julia’s pipeline command. Also the redirection 2>&1 will not work. So instead, the best thing to use is and instance of Pipe. This was not in the manual. I stumbled upon it in an issue discussion on GitHub. So a good why to do what I am after is to run.

julia> p=Pipe()
Pipe(uninit => uninit, 0 bytes waiting)
 
julia> run(pipeline(`ffprobe -i  somefile.mkv`,stderr=p))

This would create a pipe object p that is then used to capture stderr after the execution of the command. Next we need to close the input end of the pipe.

julia> close(p.in)

Finally we can use the pipe with grep to filter the output.

julia> readstring(pipeline(p,`grep Duration`))
"  Duration: 00:04:44.94, start: 0.000000, bitrate: 128 kb/s\n"

We can then do a little regex magic to get the duration we are after.

julia> matchall(r"(\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}.\d{2})",ans)[1]
"00:04:44.94"